Literary Liaisons

A blog about writing and all things story…

How to end my novel



Me, National Gallery London



The last few weeks I’ve been stuck, confused and bewildered about how to end my novel – writing in circles, lost in my own story. During the last year my main protagonist became another sort of fellow all together; not at all who I thought he was when we started out on this journey. Consequently, the end I had envisioned no longer fit his character arch.

One thing that has helped me break, no crash though this brick wall I was banging

my head against, is reading and re-reading Jack and Bob’s blog; it’s like taking a
cliff notes literature class. This particular section on Story and Myth http://weekendnovelist.com/website_rewrite/weekend_novelist_blog/?page_id=316
helped me get back in touch with my main protagonist core story. It facilitated in guiding me out of the way of the story I’m trying to tell. Learning to get out of our own way is a difficult skill. But, until we/I do, the story lacks the truth of the characters that inhabit it. Another exercise that is helping me reign in my story is what Jack and Bob call the ‘cut to’. See their book The Weekend Novelist http://www.weekendnovelist.com/
The ‘cut to’ (one paragraph chapter/scene descriptions ending when you ‘cut to’ the next scene – like a scene list) is helping tighten up my structure and find some cavernous holes in my story. Good luck. If you get lost in your story then seek guidance form those who have gone before…

Advertisements

3 comments on “How to end my novel

  1. Diane J.
    January 10, 2011

    Love the links, thank you. Glad to hear you didn't just break through, you crashed through. You are a wonderful inspiration!

  2. Dorothy Rice
    January 8, 2011

    Mindy, I enjoyed your post. You may remember me from the conference in October. I too hope to finish my novel this year. I am reading bits of Jack and Bob's blog as well, particularly the parts on structure as I am getting lost in too many words, too many pieces and parts. I found the entry on chapter vs. scene and ways to think about both very helpful and have re-read several times. Best wishes for a productive year.

  3. Jack
    January 8, 2011

    Mindy, you are the perfect student. You get it. Thanks for mentioning the blog and the books. Unique..adj. 1. Being the only one of its kind…Excerpted from American Heritage Talking DictionaryCopyright © 1997 The Learning Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Comments are closed.

Information

This entry was posted on January 8, 2011 by in Uncategorized.
Create Some Buzz

Social Media Training for Authors SITE CURRENTLY UNDER CONSTRUCTION

WILDsound Writing and Film Festival Review

Feature Screenplay, TV Screenplay, Short Screenplay, Novel, Stage Play, Short Story, Poem, Film, Festival and Contest Reviews

Rosie Amber

Book Reviewer, Avid Reader and Bookworm. Campaigning to link more readers to writers. People do not forget books that touch them or excite them—they recommend them.

Ellen T. McKnight

~ connecting through story ~

A Writer's Path

Sharing writing tips, information, and advice.

Eric Schlehlein, Author/Freelance writer

(re)Living History, with occasional attempts at humor and the rare pot-luck subject. Sorry, it's BYOB. All I have is Hamm's.

Prayer Pilgrim

Walking the Oregon Coast on a Pilgrimmage for Prayer

thewriterscafe247

The 24 hours Writing Hotspot and Hang Out

Elan Mudrow

The Ridges of Intertextuallity

David Gaughran

Let's Get Digital

Kristen Lamb's Blog

We Are Not Alone

%d bloggers like this: