Literary Liaisons

A blog about writing and all things story…

Does A Cover Sell A Book?

We’ve all heard the old saying, “you can’t tell a book by its cover.” Maybe so, but you sure can sell one if the cover is good. This past week has been all about book covers in my world. I’ll reveal mine for my upcoming novel, Return to Sender, soon. Meanwhile, I thought some info on covers was a good idea.
SallyinItalyLast September I had the pleasure of walking through the breathtakingly beautiful Lauterbunnen Valley in Switzerland with Sally A. Nemeth who is the Owner/Senior Graphic Designer at SallyAnne Design, a freelance marketing and publication design firm in Kansas City, MO. And so I asked her to do a guest post about book covers. Here’s Sally….

 

You shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but …
… the cover is the first thing your reader sees, make it work for you. SallyAnneDesign

If you are designing your own cover:
1. Choose an image (photo or illustration) that reflects the content of the story. It should entice the reader to open the book, but not give away the ending. 😉
2. Pay attention to copyright. While it may seem that an image is “free” because you found it on the internet, that’s not the case. There are many, reasonably-priced stock photo companies that can provide you with an image that is royalty-free and keep you out of trouble. (istockphoto.com, shutterstock.com, thinkstock.com, etc.)
3. While it’s possible to run type over an image, be careful, it’s tricky. It’s important that your reader doesn’t have to hunt for your title and name. If you’re a novice, start with type on a plain background.
4. Create a hierarchy with your type. The largest type for the title, followed by a smaller descriptive phrase, tagline, etc., and end with the author’s name. Keep the copy together, not floating in different places on the cover, it will be easier for the reader to identify.
5. Don’t use more than two typefaces. A decorative typeface is fine for the title, but use a simpler typeface for the tagline and author’s name. This will create a nice contrast and help lead the eye through the text.
6. Save detailed information and bios for the back cover.
7. If you need help, hire a graphic designer to create the cover for you.
Note: If you are short on funds, check with local universities that offer graphic arts programs. Students needing samples for their portfolio, will often create excellent artwork for a smaller fee plus expenses and a credit line on the back cover.

Submitted by Sally A. Nemeth, Senior Graphic Designer
Sally A. Nemeth is the Owner/Senior Graphic Designer at SallyAnne Design, a freelance marketing and publication design firm in Kansas City, MO. With over 25 years experience, Sally creates newsletters, logos, book and magazine covers, posters, annual reports and other marketing collateral. Email: sallyannedesign@mac.com –

This seemed to be the most appropriate cover of Sally’s to use as a sample. Happy Memorial Day Weekend. BookCover

Advertisements

One comment on “Does A Cover Sell A Book?

  1. Jack Remick
    May 24, 2014

    Good advice here. Thanks, Mindy, for posting.

Comments are closed.

Information

This entry was posted on May 24, 2014 by in Uncategorized.
The 2017 Seattle Writing Workshop

Get Your Writing Published: May 6, 2017

Create Some Buzz

Social Media Training for Authors SITE CURRENTLY UNDER CONSTRUCTION

WILDsound Writing and Film Festival Review

Feature Screenplay, TV Screenplay, Short Screenplay, Novel, Stage Play, Short Story, Poem, Film, Festival and Contest Reviews

Rosie Amber

Book Reviewer, Avid Reader and Bookworm. Campaigning to link more readers to writers. People do not forget books that touch them or excite them—they recommend them.

Ellen T. McKnight

~ connecting through story ~

A Writer's Path

Sharing writing tips, information, and advice.

Eric Schlehlein, Author

(re)Living History, with occasional attempts at humor and the rare pot-luck subject. Sorry, it's BYOB. All I have is Hamm's.

Prayer Pilgrimage

Walking the Oregon Coast on a Pilgrimmage for Prayer

thewriterscafe247

The 24 hours Writing Hotspot and Hang Out

Elan Mudrow

The Ridges of Intertextuallity

David Gaughran

Let's Get Digital

%d bloggers like this: