Literary Liaisons

A blog about writing and all things story…

How Objects Tell Your Story

Below is my article that was originally published in the Willamette Writer Magazine last year.

~In 2011 I embarked on one of the harshest undertakings; I placed what I thought was the final draft of my novel in a drawer for one year. Why? Because, as I told others in my most knowledgeable author voice, “A writer needs distance from their material before editing and rewriting.”

While that’s true, the real reason was, the story didn’t work. I thought it worked, it worked in my head, but based on a few shrewd readers it didn’t work in theirs.

During that year–fighting the wicked temptation to tweak pages, chapters and plots–I turned my attention to books on rewriting, in search of a magic key to unlock my manuscript and turn it into a novel, the kind people wanted to read. I took workshops, and reaped too many tips to list. All that matters is that nothing helped, until one day . . . .

I read yet another craft book, and SHAZAM! You know how it feels when something simple smacks you like a Mack51jHU2LH6wL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_ truck of a good idea? Well, chapter 14 in the The Weekend Novelist Re-Writes the Novel by Robert J. Ray, did that for me. The ‘objects lesson’ taught me to utilize my story objects (often called plot-devices) as shorthand for backstory and eliminate a lot of dense narrative.

Finally, that magic key!

“Objects tell your story.” Ray writes. “When you rewrite your novel, you can tighten your story by repeating a single object; car, train, statue, slipper, harpoon, book. There’s a good chance the objects are already there, in your manuscript, waiting to be found, to be selected, to be repeated, to be laid down like neon breadcrumbs in the forest. Readers follow breadcrumbs.”

I began to see the power of storytelling objects everywhere. What’s Lord of the Rings without the ring, Cinderella without glass slippers, The Notebook without the book, or poor little Forest Gump without his box of chocolates?

No glass slippers, no enchanted tale, just a barefoot girl with an unfortunate name who probably does not go from rags to riches and who likely does not find her fella . . . what’s the point?

In Nicholas Spark’s novel The Notebook, that evocative leather bound book literally contains their love story. And that chocolate box on Forest Gump’s lap is a metaphor for the story to come; “Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you’re gonna get.” And oh-boy does that plot device set up and deliver a story.

Though easily overdone, an object that’s well-crafted, or emerges organically from setting or characters can establish a character’s values and thus inform and enhance the story.

In a Willamette Writers Conference screenwriting/storytelling workshop taught by Clark Kohanek, he too touched on the objects lesson. “Think about Die Hard,” Kohanek said, “when Bruce Willis enters with the teddy bear. We immediately know that object defines what’s important to him; family.”

That fuzzy teddy bear represents Willis’s values and reenters the story burnt and dirty, but safe, like him, ready to reunite with what he values so much he’d kill for. That object represents the driving force, and heart of the story because it’s valued by the protagonist.

Eventually, in rewriting my novel, the protagonist, Theo Riley, now has a toy soldier, a stack of blood-stained returned love letters, and a photograph of Korean Orphans. This trinity of objects define him, inform his moral compass and ultimately chart his destiny. These objects give the reader an understanding of Theo on a deeper level. They are backstory shorthand, and explaining it once eliminated pages of narration, because when the reader sees the tin soldier, letters, or pictures (Neon Breadcrumbs), they remember . . . because objects are a writer’s magic keys.

Short Bio

Mindy Halleck is a Pacific Northwest author, award winning writer, and writing & social media instructor. Her short story, The Sound of Rain, which placed in the Writer’s Digest Literary Contest blossomed into her first novel Return to Sender. Halleck blogs at Literary Liaisons and is an active member of the Pacific Northwest writing community. www.MindyHalleck.com

Mindy will be teaching HOW OBJECTS HELP TELL A STORY at the conference this August.

2016 UPDATE: I taught that class at the WW conference and it went better than imagined. So many happy writers. SO I’m teaching it again this year in Manzanita Oregon at the Hoffman Center for the Arts as part of their Writers Workshop series on Saturday Sept. 17th 2016 form 10-3. To sign up please visit this page  http://bit.ly/2bFwvjU

Mindy’s AMAZON Page  Facebook  Twitter @Mindyhalleck Goodreads  www.MindyHalleck.com

me on WW

 

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4 comments on “How Objects Tell Your Story

  1. Behind the Story
    August 13, 2015

    An excellent tip, Mindy. I’m going to try to find or invent those objects for my novel in progress.

    • Mindy
      August 13, 2015

      Often they are already in your story. Take a second look, you may surprise yourself. Best of luck. Mindy

  2. historyweaver
    August 12, 2015

    Mindy, congrats on your win. What a powerful story. Ha! I recognized the objects from workshops with Robert Ray. Certainly have those in my novels. I will have to check his book on rewrites. I have a novel that is worth saving. Need some advice on how to finish the ending.

    • Mindy
      August 12, 2015

      Thanks so much for reading. I highly recommend Robert’s book for anyone doing a rewrite. Good luck. Mindy

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